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SI39. A John Lennon And George Harrison Handwritten Shooting Script For The Beatles' "Hello Goodbye" Video Shoot At The Saville Theatre.

Most fans will agree that 1967 was the most colorful year of all for The Beatles. Starting early in the year with the "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" videos, it was clear that something had changed since we last saw the band in 1966. There are practically more colors in the "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" album cover than in all of the other Beatles album covers combined, and moving on just 3 weeks after the release of "Sgt. Pepper", The Beatles satellite appearance on 'Our World' (although filmed in black and white later colorized in 1995), was an extraordinarily vibrant and colorful scene.

But it wasn't just the colors on and around The Beatles that were colorful in 1967....it was the music....and it was definitely very palpable. One of the more colorful of all the songs released in that amazing year was Paul's catchy, lighthearted and upbeat "Hello Goodbye", which wound up being the 'A side' of the last single they put out in 1967. The song literally pops with vibrancy.

The Beatles produced 2 different mimed music videos for "Hello Goodbye", over a decade before the inception of MTV, with one airing on "The Ed Sullivan Show". This video shows The Beatles donning their vivid "Sgt. Pepper" album cover Victorian era military costume suits - it was the second and last time they would all appear dressed in them, with the album cover shoot being the first. Just before the halfway point, they are all waving while wearing their 1963 grey collarless suits in a tongue in cheek nod to 'the early days'. In the other version of the video, they are wearing their 'civilian' street clothes.

The videos were shot on November 10, 1967 at the Brian Epstein / NEMS leased Saville Theatre in London. Paul produced the videos, but it was John and George who scripted out the scenes, on this very piece of paper. With John writing the title "HELLO GOODBYE" at the top and doing some drawings that included 2 heavily lashed eyes, a round face with 9 legs supporting it (9 was John's number), musical notes, and an upside down question mark. John put quite a bit of thought into the scenes and scripted out the entire #1 "civilian clothes" video and most of the #2 "Sgt. Pepper" suits video, with some help from George towards the end.

Video #1 has The Beatles in their street clothes, with a stage backdrop depicting a rural setting and 6 lei wearing, grass skirted dancing hula girls towards the end of the song. In video #2, The Beatles are are once again in their "Sgt. Pepper" suits - over 7 months after the album cover shoot - with a psychedelic stage backdrop and the same 6 hula dancers coming in towards the end. A 3rd video was made from outtakes of the first 2 videos, which included comical footage of The Beatles dancing The Twist. It's clear that The Beatles had a lot of fun while filming the promotional videos for "Hello Goodbye".

The writing on this significant page, with bits of the song lyrics inserted, is as follows:

ALL IN JOHN LENNON'S HAND:

HELLO GOODBYE

1-1 Long shot. whole song: civvies (meaning 'civilian clothes')

1-3 3 shots G.R.J. half way thru / end piece: civvies.

1-4 C U. J. then R. (you say yes) (chorus bit middle 8) it ran out. ('C. U. stands for 'Close Up').

1-5 medium C.U. P. and G pan to R. + J back etc P + G: all except end.

1-6 C.U. G. (chorus bit.) ducks out shows light the 'I say yes but' etc.

1-7 C.U. P. (R in back.) whole song

1-8 L.S. end with girls with curtain. (L.S. is 'Long shot).

1-9 closer shot in P.G.R. with girls pans over J. curtain

1-10 almost / same shot. girls heads cut out at beginning J. curtain

1-11 curtain down opens at start of song. P. waving and pointing etc. finishes half way.

2-1 Sgt. Pepper. Curtain opens M.S. whole song no bits.

2-2 L.S. with girls. end bit.

2-3 M.C.U. end bit with girlshe

2-4 C.U. P. G. raise curtain cuts to R. solo. + J. doing Elvis pans back to P. G.

2-5 side shot 4. (crossed out)

THIS IS WHERE GEORGE HARRISON TAKES OVER

IN THE HAND OF GEORGE HARRISON:

slightly angled from right - all 4 quite straight till solo - J+P. jump a bit end verse after solo.

2-6 close up G. focus pull from G to R. (Hello Goodbye chorus) stays on R. for solo

IN THE HAND OF MAL EVANS:

2-7 MCS. Ringo. Smiles

Here is a link to video #2:

  click here to view video # 2

Here is video #3. Clearly this was a fun day for The Beatles:

 click here to view video # 3 

The page measures 7 3/4" x 10" and is in excellent overall condition, with writing in black felt tip marker (including additional Lennon artwork at the top) and black ballpoint pen starting in 1-9. Everything about the song "Hello Goodbye" and the accompanying videos demonstrates positivity and The Beatles truly enjoying themselves while in the midst of their creative process. This is an amazing, tangible piece of "Hello Goodbye" and the promotional videos that were made to showcase it ....$120,000

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Comparisons of the look of the 2 promotional videos for "Hello Goodbye".

Comparisons of the look of the 2 promotional videos for "Hello Goodbye".

Here is John doing his "Elvis", as he writes in section 2-4.

Here is John doing his "Elvis", as he writes in section 2-4.

The Beatles sharing a laugh during some down time for the video #1 shoot. This was clearly a pleasurable day for the band.

The Beatles sharing a laugh during some down time for the video #1 shoot. This was clearly a pleasurable day for the band.


SI38. A Set Of Beatles Autographs Obtained During the Filming Of “Magical Mystery Tour”

On Monday, September 11, 1967, two weeks of filming commenced on The Beatles' new self-conceived movie project, "Magical Mystery Tour". Boarding a Bedford VAL Panorama coach bus in central London, The Beatles and a motley crew of passengers (which consisted of their friends and office staff, a camera crew and a handful of actors and actresses of various shapes and sizes, including a ‘Rubber Man’) headed west, cruising the British countryside through Hampshire, Devon, Cornwall and Somerset counties. Along the way, the coach passed through such villages and towns as Widecombe-in-the-Moor (Dartmoor), Bodmin, Newquay, Watergate Bay, Porth and Taunton, stopping at many of these locales.

The final week of primary filming (September 19-24) was done at the West Malling RAF Air Station near Maidstone, Kent. Here, most of the interior sequences were filmed (including "Aunt Jessie's Dream" and the climactic “Your Mother Should Know” staircase scene), along with exterior shoots for the Marathon and Tug-Of-War scenes and also what is perhaps the apex of the entire movie – the “I Am The Walrus” music video!

This two-week period provided dozens of fans along the route with access to the group - the most anyone had seen since the waning days of 1963, just prior to their worldwide fame. Even more incredible was the improvisational nature of much of the script, which resulted in some of these fans being utilized as impromptu extras in selected sequences.

Because of The Beatles' presence among the public while they were making the film, many of the scant few authentic autograph sets from that amazing year 1967 – a year that found The Beatles at the height of their creative powers - were signed during the filming of "Magical Mystery Tour". Offered here is one such set, signed at the West Malling RAF Air Station on a blue colored autograph album page. All four have autographed beautifully in pencil, with Paul McCartney inscribing "To Ingrid, love" before signing. The page measures 4 1/1" x 4" and is in excellent overall condition.

Autograph sets from this late in The Beatles’ career are quite desirable because they had all but stopped signing for fans after their breakthrough in America three and a half years earlier. In recent years, Beatles autograph sets from the year 1967 have literally dried up and seldom appear anywhere for sale.

The set could appropriately be framed with one of the West Malling photos contained within the “Magical Mystery Tour” LP booklet. The larger of these images (12” x 24”) features The Beatles in full stride during the amazing “I Am The Walrus” video shoot.

If you are a fan of the “Magical Mystery Tour” film, and in particular the two music videos (“I Am The Walrus” and “Your Mother Should Know”) shot at West Malling RAF Air Station, or the if the spectacular and colorful 1967 is your favorite ‘Beatle year’ and you want to have an ultra-rare 1967 autograph set - then this would be the perfect addition to your collection……$10,000

           

  The Beatles at West Malling RAF Air Station during the time the autographs were obtained

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SI33. A Nice Set of Beatles Autographs Signed Just Days After Their Appearance At The Royal Command Performance.

On November 7, 1963 The Beatles flew to Dublin, Ireland, where they played their only 2 gigs ever in the country at the Adelphi Cinema later that evening – one at 6:30 and the other at 9:00. Just 3 days earlier they made their famous appearance before the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret at the Royal Command Performance at the Prince of Wales Theatre in London, which was a high point for them to that point in their career. Their second album “With The Beatles” was all set to come out in just a few weeks, as was the “I Want To Hold Your Hand” single, and at this point in their upward trajectory the band was really starting to hit their stride. It would be 3 months to the day later that they made the trip over to the United States and from there the rest was music and pop culture history.

This set of autographs is found on the reverse of an airport ‘Landing Card’, obtained by “Mr. Shrimpton”, who has written up details of how he obtained the autographs as he was working for British European Airways (B.E.A.). While he has mistaken the year as 1962 (which happens often when people are recalling an event that took place over 50 years ago), he was aware at the time that he met The Beatles that they had only very recently did the Royal Command Performance, as it was big news in England, and in fact he states that he discussed the show with them.

Measuring 4” x 6”, the card has been folded in half widthwise and has some staining. The signatures date from precisely this period in 1963 and all four have autographed as nicely as they could have on the day. Each signature is beautifully scripted, with every letter pronounced. This is a nice set of Beatles autographs from an exciting period for the band.


     

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SI40. An Incredibly Rare B.O.A.C. Beatles Bahamas Special Flight Menu, Signed Beautifully By All On The Way To Film "HELP!"

On February 22, 1965, The Beatles boarded a specially chartered Boeing 707 B.O.A.C. - Cunard for a flight to The Bahamas, via New York, to start filming their second feature film entitled "HELP!". For the flight, a specially produced (and needless to say incredibly rare) in flight menu was produced for the trip, which was dubbed the "Beatles Bahamas Special". The menu measures 7 ½” x 10 ¾” all four have autographed the back cover magnificently. John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison have signed in black ballpoint pen, while Ringo Starr has used a black felt tip marker to sign. The autographs are all beautifully scripted and large – the Lennon and McCartney signatures each measure 5” long. This is a fabulous set of Beatles autographs, signed as nicely as each could have done on the day. Additionally, fellow “HELP!” movie cast members Eleanor Bron and Roy Kinnear have signed the menu, and Paul McCartney has also jokingly signed as ‘Billy Wyatt’, a fictional character he made up.

It is well documented that The Beatles, despite the fact that the plane was full with cast and crew, were smoking marijuana and according to both John and George, they were very stoned for most of the trip. In fact, when asked shortly after they landed by a reporter "Well John, how was the tip over, did you all get bored on the flight, or did you have things to keep you entertained, that you all were doing?". John's reply was simple "Well, err, we all got stoned". It is a well known fact that The Beatles smoked marijuana all throughout the filming of the "HELP!" movie.

When The Beatles’ Pot-Smoking Made Filming ‘Help’ a Nightmare

The menu was signed for the pilot of the plane, Wing Commander E.E. Rodley, D.S.O., D.F.C., A.F.C., a highly decorated Royal Air Force pilot with a distinguished career in civil aviation, particularly in World War II. This Beatles signed menu is exceptional, magnificently signed by all of The Beatles, with impeccable provenance and it also has great association to the fabulous “HELP!” movie.

        

 Image 1:  The front cover of the "Beatles Bahamas Special" menu.       

 Image 2:  The signed back cover of the "Beatles Bahama Special" menu.

 Image 3:  The first inside page of the "Beatles Bahamas Special" menu.

 Image 4:  The Beatles at London Airport on February 22, 1965, just before boarding the flight.

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SI42. A Beatles Autographed Empire Airways Postcard, Autographed On Their Way Back From Australia In Mid-1964

On June 3rd, 1964, The Beatles departed London to embark upon their first World Tour. But it wasn't the usual Beatles lineup as we know it, because Ringo Starr had just been admitted to the hospital with a sudden case of tonsillitis. Facing the cancellation of several concerts, manager Brian Epstein had to scramble and quickly find an experienced and suitable replacement for Ringo. On short notice, talented session drummer Jimmie Nicol was hired and for the next 13 days he was a Beatle! He was perfect for the job - and Ringo's stage wear fit him well - which was a huge bonus, because there was no time to order new matching stage suits for him. During his time with the band, The Beatles played shows in Denmark, The Netherlands, Hong Kong and Australia. On June 14th, in Melbourne, Australia, a fully recovered Ringo rejoined The Beatles in Melbourne, and he finished out the Oceania segment of the World Tour, which included concerts in multiple cities in New Zealand, then back to Australia for a few more shows. On July 1st, the day their final show down under in Brisbane, The Beatles flew back from Australia on a Qantas Boeing 707 V jet airplane. While aboard this plane on the journey back home to London they stopped twice to refuel, in Singapore and Frankfurt, and they landed back in England just before noon on July 2nd.

The signed postcard offered here features a color shot a Qantas Boeing 707 V plane similar to the one they flew back home from Australia. On the back of the card, all four Beatles have autographed beautifully in blue ballpoint pen. The signatures are extraordinary examples, with each about as nicely as they could have signed on the day. The pilot of the plane, who got the autographs for his 14 year old neighbor Liz, has written his name in the lower right hand corner. This signed postcard comes with a letter from the original recipient, who has had the pleasure of owning it until very recently. The card measures 5 1/2" x 3 1/2" and is in very good condition overall, having been well kept over the years. With excellent provenance, signed by The Beatles at exactly the half way point of 1964, this is a magnificent representative set of Beatles autographs from that important and historical year in the history of the band.

     

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CP5. An Extremely Rare Scottish Tour Program Signed By The Beatles, April 1964

April of 1964 was a really good month for The Beatles. Having 'conquered America' just two months prior, by he end of April they had already filmed the entirety of their first feature film entitled "A Hard Day's Night". At the beginning of the month, they held the Top 5 spots on the Billboard charts with "Can't Buy Me Love", "Twist And Shout", "She Loves You", "I Want To Hold Your Hand" and "Please Please Me" - a feat that has never been accomplished since. Towards the very end of the month The Beatles did a few live shows on the Spring 1964 U.K. Tour. April 29th and 30th saw them in Scotland - Edinburg and Glasgow respectively. For this 2 day only engagement, a super rare concert program was produced.

The program, which measures 8” x 10 ½”, is 16 pages long cover to in total and features a blue paper outer cover which depicts four separate drawings of ‘Beatle hair’, each one representing a band member. Within the program there are individual and group biographies, as well as information related to the opening acts, which included among others Peter Jay and the Jaywalkers and also The Remo Four. This is an extremely rare Beatles tour program in unsigned form – worth over $400 without ink in today’s market. All four have autographed this rarity within, on their bio spread beautifully in blue ballpoint pen near their respective image, with John Lennon signing in the text below his likeness. The photo of the band here was taken by quintessential Beatles photographer Dezo Hoffmann during the session that produced some of the most iconic and recognizable shots of The Beatles ever taken, wearing their grey collarless suits and to have a Dezo image from that significant photo session signed by the Beatles is a major achievement for any collector. In addition to the signed bio spread, George Harrison has autographed the first inside page, a page that states in big block letters below a smiling pose of the band: “THE BEATLES SHOW”. This program was signed by The Beatles on April 30th, the day they played The Odeon Cinema in Glasgow.

Beatles autographed concert programs have become incredibly scarce in recent years, as most are now firmly rooted in collections. The vast majority of Beatles signed programs in existence were from the year 1963, when they were more accessible in the U.K. than they were in later years….especially after achieving the fame that they did after their first U.S. visit in early 1964. For any collector looking for a significant signed Beatles display piece with strong visual appeal that is a cut above an album page, without breaking the bank, this one is for you……$18,500

     

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AP6. A Set Of Beatles Autographs From April Of 1963, George Harrison Has Written "BEATLES"

This Beatles signed yellow autograph album page measures 4 1/2" x 4". All four members of the band have autographed this page beautifully, with John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr signing in blue ballpoint pen, while Paul McCartney has used a black ballpoint pen to sign. Ringo has added "XX" after signing, but more significantly George has written "BEATLES" at the top of the page, above his autograph, which adds a great touch to this set of autographs.

Autograph sets on which one of the band members has written the word "Beatles" have become increasingly scarce over the years. These rare sets are more desirable and valuable than an autograph set without "Beatles" being added by a band member.

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SI36. A Stunning Set Of Autographs Obtained During the Filming Of “Magical Mystery Tour”

On Monday, September 11, 1967, two weeks of filming commenced on The Beatles' new self-conceived movie project, "Magical Mystery Tour". Boarding a Bedford VAL Panorama coach bus in central London, The Beatles and a motley crew of passengers (which consisted of their friends and office staff, a camera crew and a handful of actors and actresses of various shapes and sizes, including a ‘Rubber Man’) headed west, cruising the British countryside through Hampshire, Devon, Cornwall and Somerset counties. Along the way, the coach passed through such villages and towns as Widecombe-in-the-Moor (Dartmoor), Bodmin, Newquay, Watergate Bay, Porth and Taunton, stopping at many of these locales.

The final week of primary filming (September 19-24) was done at the West Malling RAF Air Station near Maidstone, Kent. Here, most of the interior sequences were filmed (including "Aunt Jessie's Dream" and the climactic “Your Mother Should Know” staircase scene), along with exterior shoots for the Marathon and Tug-Of-War scenes and also what is perhaps the apex of the entire movie – the “I Am The Walrus” music video!

This two-week period provided dozens of fans along the route with access to the group - the most anyone had seen since the waning days of 1963, just prior to their worldwide fame. Even more incredible was the improvisational nature of much of the script, which resulted in some of these fans being utilized as impromptu extras in selected sequences.

Because of The Beatles' approachability, many of the scant few authentic autograph sets from that amazing year 1967 – a year that found The Beatles at the height of their creative powers - were signed during the filming of "Magical Mystery Tour". Offered here is one such set, signed at the West Malling RAF Air Station on a large piece of card measuring 7 1/2 inches wide by 8 inches high. All four have signed this card beautifully in blue ballpoint pen and overall this is just a stunning set of autographs, highlighted by the fact that John’s signature is just over a staggering 6 ½ inches long! That’s one of the largest in existence and in person this autograph set will blow you away.

These signatures were obtained by a female cook who worked at the RAF base who had the opportunity to get The Beatles autographs for her daughter. It comes with a signed note from the girl, Jill Elsdon. Autograph sets from this late in The Beatles’ career are quite desirable because they had all but stopped signing for fans after their breakthrough in America three and a half years earlier. In recent years, Beatles autograph sets from the year 1967 have literally dried up and seldom appear anywhere for sale. The set, which has a light horizontal crease across the center and a few small marks, could appropriately be framed with one of the photos contained within the “Magical Mystery Tour” LP booklet. The larger of these images (12” x 24”) features The Beatles in full stride during the amazing “I Am The Walrus” video shoot.

If you are a fan of the “Magical Mystery Tour” film, and in particular the two music videos (“I Am The Walrus” and “Your Mother Should Know”) shot at West Malling RAF Air Station, or the if the spectacular and colorful 1967 is your favorite ‘Beatle year’ and you want to have an ultra-rare 1967 autograph set that is stunning in person - then this is the one for you……$17,500


 

    

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SI28. An original Paul McCartney Handwritten Beatles Stage Used Concert Set List with 20 Songs in total - Making it the Most Extensive Beatles Set List Known.

Among the most prized of all investment-grade Beatles signed or handwritten material are stage-used set lists. These were not done for the gratification of a fan, but for the group's own private use. That these set lists survived the decades at all is incredible and, in fact, so few still exist as they were created for the moment -- to be used by the band for reference for a very short period of time and then tossed out.   

There is simply no denying that, in the realm of handwritten artifacts, few pieces can approach the scarcity, historical appeal and intrinsic value of an original Beatles stage-used set list. Particularly in the early days when their show repertoire was in a constant state of flux, a set list was needed to guide their performance, to literally give them a quick reference while the concert was in progress, for the order of songs they would play at a given show. These were hastily written out -- often just prior to the show -- on whatever paper was available at the moment. The lists could be written on hotel notepaper, envelopes, paper scraps, promotional cards, even cigarette packs.

To demonstrate the extreme rarity of an authentic Beatles handwritten set list, it should be noted that, to date, only around a dozen have ever surfaced…..including those still owned by The Beatles themselves.  Of these scant few still in existence, several of these lists were attached to the guitars of either John Lennon, Paul McCartney or George Harrison, and those have remained either on the guitar(s), or have since been taken off – yet kept nearby.

Of those set lists that found their way into the collector’s market (just over half a dozen), these are all tucked away in collections and rarely ever become available on the marketplace. With so few known to exist, one can only imagine just how infrequently a Beatles set list comes onto the market. The vast majority are in the hands of private collectors and will likely stay there. On a rare occasion, one will become available to those astute enough to appreciate their historical significance and extreme desirability.

Presented for your consideration, one of very few Beatles handwritten, concert-used set lists that have ever become available for the private collector -- this one dating from the spring of 1963 – written out completely in the hand of Paul McCartney for an extraordinarily long concert performance that The Beatles gave on April 2, 1963, at the Azena Ballroom in Sheffield, England. The concert was promoted by then 21 year old Peter Stringfellow, who went on to become a highly successful London-based night club owner. Starting in 1962, Stringfellow was renting St. Aidan’s Church Hall in Sheffield (also known as the “Black Cat Club”) on Friday nights and presenting local mediocre bands. Because the demand for tickets far exceeded the fan capacity at the Black Cat Club, Stringfellow was forced to find a much bigger venue, and he moved the show to the Azena Ballroom.

The songs that were to be played by The Beatles were written on the back of a March 1963 group Parlophone Records promotional photo card which measures 5 ½” x 3 ½”. The overall condition of the card is excellent, especially considering that it's 57 years old. (As a side note, the photo on the card was taken on Monday, January 21, 1963 at EMI House in London by none other than Angus McBean, the photographer credited with taking the iconic image used on the cover of the Please Please Me LP.)  

The reverse of this card boasts a staggering list of no less than 20 songs all handwritten by McCartney, making this by far the longest of the known Beatles set lists for a concert that the band did in their final formation, after hiring Ringo Starr on August 18, 1962. Represented are 13 songs which were recorded by The Beatles and appear on vinyl on the Parlophone label, including 9 of the 14 tracks found on their debut album “Please Please Me”, which came out only 11 days before this concert. The recorded songs found on this list are:

“I Saw Her Standing There”, “Chains”, “Misery”, “Love Me Do”, “Baby It’s You”, “Please Please Me”, “Ask Me Why”, “Roll Over Beethoven”, “A Taste of Honey”, “Boys”, “Do You Want To Know A Secret”, “From Me To You”, “Please Please Me” (an encore performance) and “Long Tall Sally”. “From Me To You”, The Beatles’ 3rd single in the United Kingdom which reached #1 in the charts and stayed there for 7 weeks, was released as a single 9 days after it was performed on stage at the Azena Ballroom.

The other 6 songs that The Beatles sang that evening were “Sweet Little Sixteen”, “Beautiful Dreamer”, “Hey Good Looking”, “3 Cool Cats”, “Some Other Guy” and “Keep Your Hands Off” (My Baby) – all cover songs that The Beatles were performing on and off throughout this exciting time period them – with “3 Cool Cats” appearing on the ‘Decca Audition Tapes’.

The Azena Ballroom concert was exceptionally long in comparison to other gigs they were doing at the time, which only averaged between 10 and 11 songs. The show that was guided by this set list was literally almost 2 concerts in one - with a break in between sets – as noted by Paul’s horizontal line midway down the card.

This incredible set list was obtained on the night of the concert, found left backstage after the show, by Roy Simmonite – who was the drummer for opening band “Mark Stone and the Aidens”. Included are two detailed signed letters from him – one handwritten and one typed, as well as color copies of: a photograph of him with his band onstage, a newspaper clipping advertising the event, a couple of clippings related to the Azena Ballroom show and also a quality reproduction of a photograph of The Beatles performing onstage that evening.

Keep in mind that set lists like this were never intended for fans. Most were either tossed out or kept for posterity by members of the group. The rarity of this piece cannot be overstated.

And so, for collectors of the rarest of the rare Beatles artifacts, opportunity knocks. If you've ever aspired to an original Beatles set list, here is your chance to obtain this top-drawer, rare and impressive investment-grade Beatles piece.


   

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JL2. A Rare Signed First Edition Of “In His Own Write” Autographed Beautifully By John Lennon On The Fly Leaf.

On March 23, 1964, the first solo project by any of The Beatles in any medium was released: “In His Own Write” – a book written by John Lennon that contained nonsensical short stories and poems using offbeat language, puns and play-on-words that are witty, funny and surreal in nature, which were accompanied by line drawings done by John illustrating the many caricatures found in the text. Published by Jonathan Cape in Great Britain barely a month and a half after The Beatles made their historic first visit to the U.S., “In His Own Write” was well received and sold briskly and by April 23rd, the day that John was honored at the Foyle’s Literary Luncheon in London, it was already in its 3rd printing.

Here is a First Edition copy of “In His Own Write” that has been signed magnificently by John Lennon on the fly leaf in black fountain pen. The signature is large, bold, beautifully scripted and near perfect in every respect, and it dates from precisely the time of the release of “In His Own Write”. The condition of the book is excellent, with a vertical crease visible on the front cover. First Editions of “In His Own Write” signed by John are exceedingly rare, with most being 3rd printings that were autographed by him at the aforementioned Foyle’s event. All things considered, this is one of the best John Lennon signed “In His Own Write” books in existence…..$5,000

Click here to view a short promotional video for “In His Own Write” filmed in 1964:

     
     

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SI32. A Star-Club Pay Receipt For A Week’s Worth Of Performances By The Beatles In Late 1962, Signed By John Lennon.

There is no question about it - The Beatles ‘cut their teeth’ in Hamburg, Germany, arriving there for the first time in August of 1960 for their inaugural ‘residency’. While in Germany, The Beatles honed their skills as stage performers and as their reputation grew, they wound up with larger and larger audiences and also their first recording contract, which resulted in the “My Bonnie” single that grabbed the attention of Brian Epstein and brought his vitally important presence into their orbit. Hamburg was just such an important step along the way for The Beatles in so many ways and without it their story would have inevitably been much different, and it is quite possible that they may have never become The Beatles as we know them had their time in Hamburg not transpired.

After their arrival in August 1960, The Beatles made several follow up trips to Hamburg throughout the next two years, winding up in their run there in late December 1962, at The Star-Club, a new club that was situated on Große Freiheit off the infamous Reeperbahn. It had a fabulous sound system and a capacity of up to 2,000 patrons and it was the best of all the venues that they played while in Hamburg. The Beatles performed there from mid-April through the end of May. They returned again for two weeks in November, and then for one final run of shows between December 18th-31st, after which their residency in Hamburg came to an end.

Here is the receipt for payment to The Beatles for a week’s worth of performances by the band, 7 shows in all, 3 hours per night, between December 18th and 25th. In another hand, a Star-Club representative has filled in the misspelled “The Baetles” and has defined their net pay, 750 Deutsche Marks (£67 per week) for each of the 4 members, totaling 3,000 DM, minus a 15% fee for a ‘manager’, leaving them with 2,550 DM. In the lower left hand corner is a stamp with the Star-Club logo and location, “Hamburg, St. Pauli”. John Lennon has signed for this pay for The Beatles work beautifully in blue ballpoint pen, “JWLennon”, as he did for any contracts or matters of formality during this period. The signature is perfect in every way - it’s beautifully scripted and just a magnificent example. The receipt, which measures 5 ¾” x 4 ¼”, is in exceptional condition having been well preserved over the last 57 years.

A signed Beatles performance pay receipt is an elite piece of Beatles history and few collectors in the world can boast of ownership……$15,000


        
          

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JL3.  A Scarce Signed “A Spaniard In The Works” Book Autographed By The Author, John Lennon


While John Lennon signed many copies of his first book “In His Own Write”, including dozens in a single day at the Foyle’s Literary Luncheon (held in April of 1964) honoring the author and the success of his new book – relatively few copies of his second book “A Spaniard In The Works” have surfaced to date. There were no public signing sessions for this book, and it is many, many times rarer than its predecessor.

Here is a scarce Jonathan Cape published U.K. First Edition copy of this book which has been autographed beautifully on the frontispiece by John Lennon in black fountain pen. While there are no details as to exactly when it was signed, the signature dates from very shortly after the June 1965 release date. The book is in excellent overall condition, in square tight condition with sharp corners. This book would be a great addition to a collection that already contains an autographed “In His Own Write” book……$5000

           

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SI30. A Rare Important And Revealing John Lennon Handwritten Letter, Written In Rishikesh, India While In The Midst Of Composing Most Of The Songs That Would Later Appear On “The White Album”.

In February of 1968 The Beatles with their wives and girlfriends took a journey to an ashram in Rishikesh, India in search of spiritual enlightenment. Having recently been a key influence for and the leading figures of the magnificent and colorful ‘Summer of Love’ following the release of their masterpiece album “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”, The Beatles were on top of the world, but even so they knew that a change of some sort was needed. The band was invited to the ashram by the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who they had met with previously in August of 1967 in Bangor, Wales while attending a weekend seminar on Transcendental Meditation. That trip that was cut short by the sudden and unexpected death of the band’s manager Brian Epstein, a tragic event which left The Beatles now in even more of a need some answers. This all coincided with The Beatles denunciation of drug use in favor of Transcendental Meditation, so off to Rishikesh they went.

While in India, John and George stayed the longest, with Ringo leaving after 10 days and Paul staying roughly 5 full weeks before heading home. In between marathon meditation sessions, long daytime walks, meals, group sing alongs and quite a bit of songwriting (Lennon said that he wrote 15 songs while in India – more than Paul and George combined), John took some time to answer a few letters he had received at the ashram. Of the few responses he sent out (mainly to friends), this one really stands out because of the content of the letter is absolutely incredible – it's unquestionably one of the best Lennon handwritten letters in existence. He goes into some detail about The Beatles purpose for going to India, religion – with John quoting Jesus and confirming his own personal obligation to Christianity, also talking about Transcendental Meditation as it relates to religion and through it how one can actually be 'experiencing God'.

John writes in full, with the ‘we’ and ‘us’ references in the first paragraph relating to The Beatles:

Dear Beth, Thank you for your letter and your kind thoughts. When you read that we are in India ‘searching’ for peace etc, it is not that we need faith in God and Jesus –we have faith them; It is only as if you went to stay with Billy Graham for a short time – it just so happens that our guru (‘teacher’) is Indian - and what is more natural than for us to come to India – his home. He also holds courses in Europe and America – and we will probably go to some of these as well – to learn – and to be near him. Transcendental Meditation is not opposed to any religion – it is based on the basic truths of all religions – the common denominator. Jesus said ‘the Kingdom of Heaven is at hand’ – not in some far distant time – or after death – but now. Meditation takes the mind down to that level of consciousness which is Absolute Bliss (Heaven) and through constant contact with that state – ‘the peace that surpasseth all understanding’ – one gradually becomes established in that state even when one is not meditating. All this gives one actual experience in God - not by detachment or renunciation – when Jesus was fasting etc in the desert 40 days & nights he would have been doing some form of meditation – not just sitting in the sand and praying – although meditating is a form or prayer. I hope what I have said makes sense to you – I sure it will to a true Christian – which I try to be with all sincerity – it does not prevent me from acknowledging Budda – Mohammed – and all the great men of God. God Bless You – jai guru dev.        with love,   John Lennon

Ending with “jai guru dev”, the mantra that John sang repeatedly in his beautiful composition “Across The Universe”, the letter was written out by John in black fountain pen on one sheet of stationary for the Maharishi’s own "Spiritual Regeneration Movement Foundation Of India". The stationary sheet was made so that it folds down into its own envelope, which John hand addressed a fan (Beth Dewer, from Surrey not far from where John lived at the time) who wrote to him at the ashram expressing her concerns for The Beatles and their newfound interest in studying Transcendental Meditation under the Maharishi and how it would potentially clash severely with Christianity. The return address John wrote on the envelope was simply "Rishikesh India Maharishi's Ashram". There is a tear along the fold line on the bottom third of the page, otherwise in good condition.

This spectacular handwritten Lennon letter will come with a Special Limited Edition copy of Paul Saltzman’s book “The Beatles In India”. Here is a link to see some of the fabulous pictures (all contained in the book) that Saltzman took while sharing time with The Beatles in Rishikesh in 1968.

https://thebeatlesinindia.com/book/

https://thebeatlesinindia.com/photos/

Postmarked March 25, 1968, the letter is quite lengthy with a lot of writing done by John which is very detailed and revealing, written during a really key period in the history of The Beatles. The Beatles journey to India to study Transcendental Meditation and being there without any outside interruptions, phone calls or business related distractions was an extremely fertile situation for their songwriting, and while there meditating their songwriting blossomed in a way it never had before. This was in fact the band’s most productive period and without India, there absolutely would be no “White Album” as we know it.

There aren’t many truly amazing John Lennon Beatle era handwritten letters out there and of those they rarely ever come to market, as most are tucked away in collections and unavailable. This letter and certainly is one of best of them, ranking way up there with the ‘cream of the crop’ for content, length of writing, and the time frame during which it was written as it relates to what was happening at that moment. Here is a rare chance to own and extremely scarce piece of John Lennon’s handwritten thoughts about Transcendental Meditation and religion, with several references to Jesus and God…..$75,000

            

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SI28. A "PYX Book"With A Color Version Of An Iconic Pose On The Front Cover, Signed By The Beatles.

Very shortly after the July 1963 Dezo Hoffmann photo session in London that produced 2 of the most recognizable shots of The Beatles ever taken, a publishing company called Highlight Publications set out to capitalize on The Beatles’rapidly growing popularity. The publishing company put together a magazine for the fans, licensed through PYX Productions, which was filled with many new and unseen photos of The Beatles. All of the photographs were taken by Dezo, some candid, some posed, and also included in the ‘fanzine’ were bios of each band member. With text that was often humorous in tone throughout the 24 page book, the color ‘centerfold’ with facsimile autographs of all of The Beatles served as a small poster to be taped to the wall of a fan’s bedroom. The book, which measures 7 ½” x 9 ½”, was a quality product for the 2’6 price tag (two shillings and sixpence –or one-eighth of a pound). It sold well and was a hit, thus making Highlight a nice profit. Although mostly sold on newsstands throughout Great Britain, these ‘PYX books’ were often available for purchase by vendors at concert venues.

Here is one of those PYX books that has been autographed on the front cover by all four members of The Beatles. The cover features the iconic Hoffman ‘standing collarless suits pose’ - from the aforementioned London photo shoot - which also appears on the back cover of the U.S. Capitol Records “Meet The Beatles” album, as well as in numerous, multi-sized publicity photos that were available for fans to purchase.

Although shot by Hoffmann in black and white, this image used on the front of the PYX book has been colorized - hand tinted by artists and impressively done, it looks as good as would have been possible in 1963. This color version of the classic image is magnificent and certainly much closer in reality to what The Beatles looked like at the time Hoffmann’s camera shutter clicked, locking onto his film roll one of the most seen photographs in history. Above the image of the band (although at the time it was not needed for most to identify them) “THE BEATLES” is written in big block letters.

All four have autographed on or above their respective image, with John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr signing in blue ballpoint pen, while Paul McCartney has used a dark blue fountain pen to sign. In another hand the name of the original owner “A. Richards” is written in small letters. Over the years, approximately 6 or 7 PYX books authentically signed by The Beatles on the front cover have surfaced, certainly qualifying them as very rare. Although the backstory of this piece has been lost to time, the time frame of the signatures and the inks used to sign are consistent with two other PYX books that were autographs by The Beatles in August of 1963, when they played at The Springfield Ballroom in Jersey, Channel Islands, England. This is a great image to have signed by The Beatles, especially in color…..$18,500

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AP2. A Magnificent Blue Autograph Album Page Signed By The Beatles

Here is a blue colored autograph album page that has been signed beautifully by all four members of The Beatles in dark blue ballpoint pen, with Paul McCartney adding “Beatles” at the top, above his signature. The contrast of the light blue page and dark blue ink is striking and this is a stunning set of autographs in person.

There are no specifics available as to exactly when and where the page was signed, but the signatures date to very late 1963 / very early 1964. This is a really important time period in the history of The Beatles as they were literally on the brink of becoming a worldwide phenomenon and their legendary first trip to America was only weeks away when they signed this set of autographs for a lucky fan. The page measures 4 ½” x 4”, is in excellent overall condition and would look fabulous matted and framed with a favorite album or photograph of The Beatles. Autograph sets in which one of the band members wrote “Beatles” is extremely desirable and as time passes they’re becoming very scarce and they rarely come to market.

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SI10. A Rare Autographed “Beatles Monthly” Magazine: Issue Number 3

In mid-1963, as The Beatles were well on their way on the ascent to, and it was apparent to publisher Sean O’Mahoney that they should get their very own magazine. So he approached Beatles manager Brian Epstein with the proposal that resulted in the publishing of “The Beatles Book”, known mainly as “Beatles Monthly”. The magazine ran for 77 consecutive months between August of 1963 and December 1969. During that period, readership grew steadily from 80,000 to 330,000 a month at the end of the run.

Starting off with an editorial written by publisher O’Mahoney (using the pseudonym “Johnny Dean”) the magazine featured tons of great exclusive photographs of The Beatles in action on stage, backstage, in the studio, at home and just generally ‘being Beatles’ taken by photographer Leslie Bryce, who had amazing access to the band at work and at play. There were several interesting and relevant articles in each issue, mostly written by Beatles road manager Neil Aspinall and Beatles equipment manager Mal Evans. Also found in each magazine were lyrics to Beatles songs, fan mail, polls and contests.

Here is the third issue of “Beatles Monthly”, No. 3 from October of 1963 which features a shot taken that summer of The Beatles having fun in a swimming pool. All four have autographed beautifully near their respective image in red ballpoint pen. These signatures date from the time of the issue’s release date in the Fall of 1963. Measuring 6” x 8 ¼”, the magazine is in very good condition overall, with some signs of handling.

Over the years, “Beatles Monthly’s” signed by all four on the front cover have proven to be extremely scarce, with only a handful surfacing…..$18,000

 

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SI6. A Dinner Menu from the Salutation Hotel in Perth, Scotland signed beautifully by all four Beatles during their 1963 Scottish Tour

On Saturday, October 5, 1963, The Beatles embarked on a three-night mini-tour of Scotland beginning with a show at the Concert Hall in Glasgow. The following night, Sunday, October 6th, they would play two shows for 3,000 fans at Carlton Theatre in Kirkcaldy before concluding the tour on Monday the 7th with a performance at Caird Hall in Dundee. The dates were promoted by Albert Boncini, who had made an exclusive agreement with Beatles manager Brian Epstein to present their concerts in Scotland.

While they stayed at Glasgow's Central Station Hotel the first night, they changed accommodations for the second night, choosing the oldest established hotel in Scotland -- the historic Salutation Hotel in Perth. Geographically speaking, this was a logical choice as Perth was centrally located between the final two tour cities of Kirkcaldy and Dundee. On the morning of the Monday, October 7th, they had breakfast at the Salutation, playing their final show that evening in Dundee, some 12 miles away.While they stayed at Glasgow's Central Station Hotel the first night, they changed accommodations for the second night, choosing the oldest established hotel in Scotland -- the historic Salutation Hotel in Perth. Founded in 1699, like nearly everything The Beatles were associated with, one of the most notable events of the hotel’s centuries long history is the fact that the band stayed there for 2 days. Geographically speaking, this was a logical choice as Perth was centrally located between the final two tour cities of Kirkcaldy and Dundee. They left the hotel on Monday, October 7th, playing their final show that evening in Dundee, some 12 miles away.

Offered here for your consideration is a dinner menu from the Salutation Hotel dated the 6th of October, 1963, boldly and beautifully signed in blue ballpoint pen on the reverse side by all four Beatles. This is a fabulous and nearly perfect set of Beatles autographs, signed about as nicely as they could have on that day in Scotland in 1963. As an additional, very desirable touch, Ringo Starr has written “Beatles” at the top above the four signatures. The menu, which measures 5 ½” x 8”, has been torn horizontally at the top by the original owner and it is in very good condition overall, with some signs of handling.

A mere 7 days after this menu was signed, The Beatles made their famous televised appearance on "Sunday Night At The London Palladium", which was the equivalent of the Ed Sullivan Show in Great Britain. It was this performance that signaled the start of a national frenzy and the first use of the term "Beatlemania".

This is your opportunity to own a magnificent set of Beatles signatures signed for a fan on the brink of their global fame…..$12,500

 

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SI14.  An Incredibly Rare Note Handwritten By Paul McCartney To A Female Fan, Autographed By All Of The Beatles In 1964

Here is a note handwritten by Paul McCartney to a female fan on an off white colored white sheet of paper, thanking her for a gift. It reads:

"Dear Vicky, Thanks very much for your letter and the St. Christopher medal, it was great. Love from all the Beatles", under which John, Paul, George and Ringo have signed beautifully using the same blue ballpoint pen that Paul used to write the note. These signatures date from late summer 1964, when The Beatles were on their first full-fledged tour of North America. The sheet measures 6 1/2" x 6", with folds, torn on the right side with some yellowing.

Beatles full band signed handwritten letters and notes are incredibly rare, with less than a handful surfacing to date......$24,000

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SA9. A Swedish Parlophone Records “She Loves You Sleeve” Autographed By The Beatles On Their Very First Trip Abroad

Released in the United Kingdom on August 23, 1963, “She Loves You” (with “I’ll Get You” as the B-side) was an amazing new hit record for The Beatles and it set and then went on to eclipse several records in the United Kingdom record charts. Without question “She Loves You” is the song that thrust The Beatles full scale into the British national spotlight. It was for them the next step in their amazing progression after their first chart topping hit “From Me To You”. But it was not only Great Britain that took notice – so did other European counties –  most notably Sweden, located across the North Sea, some 1,200 miles to the northeast of Liverpool.

Because of the success of “She Loves You”, The Beatles were in heavy demand in Sweden and were immediately booked to play a series of concerts there in late October. And so The Beatles left for Stockholm on October 23, 1963 - the very same day the band had finished up recording for their second album “With The Beatles”.

Here is a Swedish issue Parlophone Records 45rpm record sleeve for “She Loves You” that has been autographed beautifully by all four members of The Beatles in black ballpoint pen on their respective images. The sleeve features a great Dezo Hoffman shot from the same July 1963 photo session that produced the classic ‘seated collarless’ pose. As depicted on the yellow tinted image of this sleeve, each member not only has their own chair, but their own genuine smile.

This record sleeve was signed on October 28, 1963, when The Beatles did a 30 minute in-store autograph session at the Waidele Music Store in Borås, Sweden. Later that evening they performed in concert at the Borås Hallen in Borås. The sleeve is in good overall condition, with some areas of paper loss on the front, and written on the back are the name and initials of the original owner, “Eva Hansson”.

For any collector who has been waiting and wanting to step up to the all important category a Beatles signed record sleeve, here is your chance to own one without breaking the bank…


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SI26.  An Artistes & Staff Pass From ‘The Royal Variety Performance’, Signed By The Beatles On That Historic Night

The steep trajectory that The Beatles amazing rise to fame took in the year 1963 showed no signs of going anywhere but upward at the same angle as the end of year approached. Having released their debut album “Please Please Me”, which shot to #1 and also the chart topping singles “From Me To You” and “She Loves You”, in early November the band were poised and ready to release the freshly recorded and future smash hit “With the Beatles” album.

On November 4, 1963 The Beatles performed at the ‘Royal Variety Performance’ at the Prince of Wales Theatre in London, and it was to become one of their most important concert appearances. The ‘The Royal Variety Performance’ (also called ‘The Royal Command Performance) had roots going all the way back to 1912.  It was a gala evening held annually and by the 1960’s, it was popular variety show consisting of family entertainment which included singing, dancing, comedy and other forms of enjoyment for the viewing public, as the show was broadcast on television by the British ITV TV network. The acts were all there at the request of the Royal Family.

All four have autographed the back of this artistes and staff pass very nicely in black ballpoint pen, with Paul McCartney adding “Beatles” above his signature. This pass, which measures 4 ½” x 3 ½”, was given at the door to Philip Rose from the weekly half hour television show “Pinky and Perky” (who were actually marionette pigs). The show appeared on BBC television and Philip Rose was a manipulator of one of the puppets, and also a wise man to have his pass autographed by The Beatles that evening.

In attendance were both The Queen Mother and Princess Margaret and this is the very performance that saw John Lennon say just before The Beatles’ final song “Twist and Shout”, “For our last number, I would like to ask your help. Will the people in the cheaper seats, clap your hands? And for the rest of you, if you’ll just rattle your jewelry…..”.

For The Beatles to play The Royal Variety show in 1963 was something that even they could not have imagined as the year began, when they were barely known in Great Britain outside of their native Liverpool. Through hard work, extensive touring, and of course their amazing music – the band’s popularity spread like wildfire, bringing them to the place where they were far the biggest thing in England by the time November 4th rolled around.

While The Beatles did sign a few items on this momentous evening, the number of autograph set that have materialized to date is very low: a few programs, a couple of artistes passes and the odd autograph book page.

The Royal Variety Performance occurred less than 100 days before The Beatles’ historic first U.S. visit, and while it was indeed a great achievement for them – it was also the last of their ascending big steps before their tremendous television appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show”. Here is an opportunity to own a piece of this historic evening that occurred at the Prince Of Wales Theatre on November 4, 1963…..$20,000

  
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